The promise and premise of creativity
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The promise and premise of creativity why comparative literature matters by Eugene Chen Eoyang

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Published by Continuum in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Literature and globalization,
  • Chinese and Western,
  • Comparative literature,
  • Western and Chinese

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementby Eugene Eoyang
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPL2274 .E685 2012
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25206267M
ISBN 101441108645, 1441181032
ISBN 109781441108647, 9781441181039
LC Control Number2012003058

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the relevance of literature to life --The uses of the useless: comparative literature and the multinational corporation --Approaches --Macintosh apples and Mandarin oranges: discourse functions and dysfunctions in literary comparison --Cuentos chinos ("chinese tales"): the new chinoiserie --Cultural temptations in translation: François Cheng's. The Promise and Premise of Creativity considers literature in the larger context of globalization and "the clash of cultures." Refuting the view that the study of literature is "useless," Eoyang argues that it expands three distinct intellectual skills: creative imagination, vicarious sympathy, and capacious intuition. With the advent of the personal computer and the blurring of.   Read "The Promise and Premise of Creativity: Why Comparative Literature Matters by Eugene Eoyang (review), The Comparatist" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips. The Promise and Premise of Creativity considers literature in the larger context of globalization and "the clash of cultures." Refuting the view that the study of literature is "useless," Eoyang argues that it expands three distinct intellectual skills: creative imagination, vicarious sympathy, and capacious intuition.

The Premise and the Promise book. Read 3 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Book by Ross, Warren. The Premise and the Promise book. Read 3 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Book by Ross, Warren. The Premise and the Promise book. Read 3 reviews from the world's largest community for readers/5(3).   In partnership with Creative Screenwriting and ScreenCraft, “First Draft” is a series on everything to do with screenwriting. Save the Cat practitioners will be familiar with the phrase “the promise of the premise.” Blake Snyder used it to describe the screenplay beat he called “Fun and Games,” in which the crux of the action offered within the screenwriter’s [ ]. New Book by Steve Quayle. Jesus – The Premise of the Promise provides “Ten Helps” that allow you to live victoriously during the last days. This book is the least religious and most down-to-earth End-Times manual that you’ll ever read. And it’s also the timeliest. Snyder describes the Promise of the Premise as the “heart of the movie” and the “core and essence of the movie’s poster.” This is the part of the movie that makes the idea cool — the reason you go to see it. Think of any commercial movie premise and then think about what that premise promises — this is the part of the story where.

  The Promise of the Premise – This is when Craig Thompson’s relationship with Raina blooms, when Indiana Jones tries to beat the Nazis to the Lost Ark, when the detective finds the most clues and dodges the most bullets. This is when the main character explores the new world and the audience is entertained by the premise they have been promised.   Structure-wise, the promise of the premise comes during what Blake Snyder calls the “Fun and Games” part of the story. This is when you get to experience all the things that were promised. It’s the reason most people came to watch the movie, or decided to read the book, in the first place. The purpose of the first portion of this book is to show, through actual true stories, how imagining creates reality. Science progresses by way of hypothe-ses tentatively tested and afterwards accepted or rejected according to the facts of experience. The claim that imagining creates reality needs no more consideration than is allowed by science.   As a creative writing instructor, I often teach “tools over rules” to free students from what they “can” and “can’t” do in writing. Early on, I introduce “story promise,” or the point, usually in the first paragraph or page, when the writer gives the reader a promised .